Posts Tagged ‘internet’

Postcard from Kajiado: Cheap chinese phones and the internet

Downtown Kajiado, Kenya, 21 Oct 2011

It wasn’t the first time we’d heard this from a cyber cafe operator, but apparently the biggest challenge to mobile phone users wishing to get online by using their spanking new phones was whether they were a cheap Chinese phone or a fake.  Up and down Kenya, or right in the heart of Masai country which is where we were today in the hot sunshine, if a customer bought a cheap phone and wanted to get online they ended up coming to the nearest cyber cafe for help setting it up. The problems are legion – from the fact that only genuine brands like a Nokia or Samsung are easily and directly set up with the mobile operator’s internet connectivity by receiving an SMS to the fact that the OS was rarely well configured or programmed.  One lady we’d met earlier this week  confessed shamefacedly to using a fake Nokia for browsing – she worked for a Safaricom dealer – apparently she was saving every penny towards buying a laptop for Christmas.

It makes me think that as social networking drives many more online to connect and communicate with their extended networks, global brands have less to worry about than they imagine they do.

Internet penetration by population in African countries: mapping opportunity

Since we’re currently working on a market entry exploration study for Village Telco in Kenya, I’ve been taking a deeper look at the spread and adoption of internet use.  It struck me that the landscape is actually far more fragmented than it used to be – things have been changing so fast that gone are the days where you could look at the situation in one Sub Saharan country and extrapolate it reasonably accurately for many others.  This is particularly true for ICT as cheaper rates and smarter devices impact some locations before diffusing to others. While playing around with the numbers, some interesting observations emerged:

Data Source: www.internetworldstats.com (click for large) Chart: Semacraft Consulting Partners

I sorted the internet usage numbers by size of country – the chart above shows the top 10 countries in Africa by percentage of total population i.e. almost 15% of the continent’s people live in Nigeria, and then added on what percentage of that country’s population was online.

Data source: www.internetworldstats Chart: Semacraft Consulting Partners

The findings were surprising when you compare to this chart where I’ve sorted the countries by percentage of the population accessing the internet. (I’ve removed the French island Reunion  which showed up in 3rd place nudging Nigeria out of the top 5). Their proportion of the continent’s population is seen next to them.

The only countries that fall in the top ten – both by total population and percentage of population on the internet – are Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa and Algeria.  I had started out thinking that if I looked at internet penetration rates by population it would give me some clues about where the internet was being most rapidly adopted (and then perhaps, why). But instead, I found myself surprised by the gaps instead – Tanzania being the unexpected. The reality may be entirely different in Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Maybe if the data is looked at again separating North African countries from Sub Saharan, a different set of clusters will emerge.  I’d also like to remove all the little island nations to see what happens.

Update:  I decided to take a look at the GDP based on PPP per capita for 2011 (IMF data) for selected countries (based on the earlier two sets) just to see if there were any correlations between that and the internet.

Now this starts to get even more interesting:- Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa show internet adoption figures very different from their relative position in the comparative economy chart. You’d think that greater economic strength would demonstrate a higher internet adoption and vice versa. But South Africa’s internet adoption is  too low compared to its economic standing while Morocco’s is outstanding compared to its economy.  In the East African region, Tanzania is still the internet laggard compared to its neighbors Uganda and Kenya.