Reframing the informal sector in the African consumer market: The real African middle class

malishopThis is Ruth’s shop, on the side of the highway, approximately 5km on the road to Kisumu, from Busia in western Kenya. Not quite directly part of the borderland’s economy, that trades incessantly with each other, these businesses still manage to feed off the energy of the hustle and bustle of biashara, as it flows through the complex webs, as seen by Walther in W/Africa.

Her home, abutting her husband’s wholesale business in soft drinks (they’re registered with Coca Cola) is next door to her shop, hidden in this photograph. She buys a minimum of 10,000 shillings of goods each Thursday, just from Bungoma, and that’s only one of her many source markets. The malimali shop is the village general store or variety store. The 5 and 10 mashed with a mini department store. We bought two of her sandals. I would have paid $7 in Singapore for them and it only cost $1.80. They were made in Kenya, I think.

This is the sign of the emerging middle class that the bean counters can’t find in their datasets. This class of business abounds in the small market towns dotting the countryside and the economically stronger parts in the interior. They are wholesalers and retailers, sometimes both, as nobody wants to turn away a customer, no matter how small their wallet might be. Its an inclusive market and one that we might learn something from. It sometimes has a feeling of a socially responsible capimercantilist society.

Bright Simons was the first to point this fact out, in HBR a few years ago. He was right, as I’ve just validated through a recently completed study on the rural/urban economic linkage in western Kenya.

This entry was posted in African Consumer Market, Analysis, Base of the Pyramid, Business Models, Cashless transactions, Consumer Behaviour, Design, Distribution, Emerging Markets, Innovation Planning, Kenya, Mama Biashara, Marchés africains, Marketing, Mobile platform, Perspective, Produits de grande consommation (FMCG), Research, Retail in Africa, rural, Strategy, Sub Saharan Africa, User research and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

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