Infrastructure has a direct relationship to how much your rural business can scale

trader

Busia market, Kenya Feb 2016 (Photo: Niti Bhan)

This is a micro-wholesaler and retailer in a staple commodity. Infrastructural constraints limit the stock she can manage at one go – seen as the sack with her name on it. This indicates that it was sourced from some distance away, as this is the matatu’s informal package tracking service. It could have come from rural Uganda – some of the most productive agricultural land is in Eastern Uganda within 60km of the Kenyan border. Food is ridiculously cheap in Uganda and the fish in Busia was swimming a few hours before it landed on your plate with dhania sprinkled over it.

Similarly, that poor fish can only go so far, though the traders have built their own jua kali cold chain and can assure you of 24 hours freshness. Its the tomatos and the cabbages that wilt miserably in the searing sunshine and thus limit Mama’s daily income to the purchasing power in her neighbourhood market. She can’t wait for two days to sell her produce.

Its a natural cap on her ability to scale. Both volumes traded and distance supplied are a function of the quality of the cold chain at the very last mile of the farm to fork sustainable agricultural value chain. They need good logistics and reliable infrastructure. We can’t have the fish spoil during a power outage.

Therefore, you can see the economic importance of good infrastructure and also how such minor easy to implement tweaks can boost and trigger all sorts of emerging opportunities for entrepreneurs.

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