How social networks can share the cost of technology – An innovative payment plan

The original Prepaid Economy project grant from the iBoP Asia Project required me to design a payment plan for a shared community asset based on the exploratory user research on households managed their finances on irregular and unpredictable incomes. For the first time since I started looking into this space back in 2008 I’ve come across the use of this conceptual business model in the wild.

A successful South African entrepreneur who made his millions by selling computers in townships came up with an innovative variation of such as business model. Here are the details:

He soon realised the power of Stokvels, an informal savings pool or syndicate, in which money is contributed in lump sums on a rotational basis for family needs. Luvuyo clustered the teachers in groups of six where they contributed $35 every month. Within six months of starting the scheme, each teacher had their own computer.
[…]
He says you need to understand your business’s unique challenges to become a successful entrepreneur.

“We’re trading in Khayelitsha, where the employment rate is 60% and there’s no money. You need to be very smart in terms of how we get money and get people to pay. Some of the people coming for our services are dependent on social grants from government. They save that money for themselves to get a computer and better employment,” he says.

This entry was posted in Africa, Base of the Pyramid, Business Models, Consumer Behaviour, Design, Indigenous & Traditional, Marketing, Prepaid Economy & Informal Sector, Research, Savings, South Africa, urban and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

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